Poultry Nutrition | Bailey’s Bit About Nutrition

Poultry Nutrition
Poultry diets are made up of a mixture of several different feedstuffs including cereal grains, soybean meal, animal by-product meals, fats, and vitamins and mineral premixes. Together with fresh water, these elements provide the energy and nutrients essential for the bird’s growth, reproduction, and health.
To understand poultry nutrition, first, we need to understand their unique digestive system. First, food is taken in with the beak which is a perfect tool for pecking feed in crumble or pellet form, small grains, grass, or insects.

Pain Management | Bailey’s Bit About Nutrition

Pain Management
It is fundamentally important to address pain for the animal’s benefit and production efficiency. Noticing early physiological and behavioral changes can help producers recognize problems before the pain becomes chronic or debilitating. For example, when calves are dehorned and in pain, they will flick their ears and shake their heads repeatedly. Noticing these behavioral changes, along with redness and warmth of horn buds, gives producers the opportunity to manage calf pain and decrease the risk of future health challenges, like scours.

Rotational Grazing | Bailey’s Bit About Nutrition

Rotational Grazing 
More than one-quarter of the Midwest’s agricultural land is in some form of pasture. Rotational grazing is where one part of the pasture is grazed at a time, while the remainder pastures “rest”. Resting grazed paddocks allows forage plants to renew energy reserves, rebuild vigor, deepen their roots system, and give long-term maximum production. Below is the relationship between the number of paddocks and the rest period per acre.For optimum production, pastures should be grazed about a week before the grass heads out (goes …

Hoof Care | Bailey’s Bit About Nutrition

It is estimated that approximately 20% of lameness in cattle – dairy and beef is attributed to foot rot. Foot rot is an infectious condition that causes swelling, heat, and inflammation in cattle’s feet, resulting in severe lameness. Bacteria are responsible for causing foot rot. Fusobacterium necrphorum is the main foot rot causing bacterium. All the foot rot-causing microbes are mainly anaerobic, meaning they thrive in an environment without oxygen. Many of these bacteria are found in feces, so even healthy feet are present with bacteria.

Heat Stress | Bailey’s Bit About Nutrition

Heat Stress
Heat stress occurs when cows generate and absorb more heat than they can easily get rid of by respiration, sweating, and air blowing by them (wind or fan). Cows generate heat by digesting feed and producing milk. They absorb solar heat when out in the sun. If it is a hot day and the cow is out in the sun all day heat stress can occur.
Heat stress leads to increased respiration rates, body temperatures, sweating, and time standing.

Hay Cutting | Bailey’s Bit About Nutrition

When to cut hay is always tricky, as there are so many factors that go into it. First is the type of forage you have and its maturity. For example, bermudagrass is cut when it has greened up and reached 12-16 inches tall. Cutting the forage at optimal maturity will help maximize available nutrient content and minimize the fiber content that makes forage indigestible.
How low can you cut? When cutting alfalfa and clover, the lowest you could go would be 2 inches.

From the Ground Up | Summer 2021

From the Ground Up Newsletter | Summer 2021

Rumen Health | Bailey’s Bit About Nutrition

Rumen Health
Rumen stability must be properly managed for herd health and optimum efficiency. Feeding and nutrition management can improve production and fertility as well as reduce the length of time between calving. The rumen is found on the left side of the animal and holds around 130-200 liters. A healthy rumen will have two contractions per minute. To look for a healthy rumen, handlers must watch for regurgitation, re-chewing and re-swallowing. This process is called rumination or cud-chewing.

Calf Nutrition | Bailey’s Bit About Nutrition

Calf Nutrition
The most sensitive period for a young calf is newborn to three months of age. When they are first born, calves’ greatest need is colostrum. Colostrum is milk extracted from the mammary gland in the first 24 hours after birth, containing immunoglobulins that, when absorbed by the calf’s gut, resist disease challenges. Calves have openings in the small intestines to accommodate protein absorption, but these openings close shortly after birth. Absorption is minimal beyond 12 hours of age, so the best time to feed …

Free Choice Minerals: Summer Sale

Balance Nutrition with Needed Minerals 
Free choice minerals are essential to keep a balanced diet for all life stages. Providing livestock with a free choice option ensures a balanced diet without ration balancing. 
 
 
 
Pallet Discount (June 1 to August 31, 2021) 
Receive a $1/bag discount for each 40 bag (pallet) increment when purchasing any combination of free choice minerals. 

Featured Products:

  • “O” SK Blend – A free choice package designed to provide supplemental salt and kelp to livestock which also meets organic production standards.