BioAg Blog

CUSTOMER SUCCESS: A struggling hay field finds a solution.

Paul Burrs, a first-generation farmer from Northern Illinois, who owns and operates Hickory Ridge Farm, found his testimony for Midwestern BioAg this year. “Midwestern BioAg is going to fit well with what I need in the future,” said Burrs.
Burrs grew up working on a local farm throughout high school where he dug into his passion for agriculture and found his employer to be instrumental in helping him start his career. Upon graduating high school, Burrs went on to study agronomy at Illinois State University.

Pain Management | Bailey’s Bit About Nutrition

Pain Management
It is fundamentally important to address pain for the animal’s benefit and production efficiency. Noticing early physiological and behavioral changes can help producers recognize problems before the pain becomes chronic or debilitating. For example, when calves are dehorned and in pain, they will flick their ears and shake their heads repeatedly. Noticing these behavioral changes, along with redness and warmth of horn buds, gives producers the opportunity to manage calf pain and decrease the risk of future health challenges, like scours.

Rotational Grazing | Bailey’s Bit About Nutrition

Rotational Grazing 
More than one-quarter of the Midwest’s agricultural land is in some form of pasture. Rotational grazing is where one part of the pasture is grazed at a time, while the remainder pastures “rest”. Resting grazed paddocks allows forage plants to renew energy reserves, rebuild vigor, deepen their roots system, and give long-term maximum production. Below is the relationship between the number of paddocks and the rest period per acre.For optimum production, pastures should be grazed about a week before the grass heads out (goes …

Hoof Care | Bailey’s Bit About Nutrition

It is estimated that approximately 20% of lameness in cattle – dairy and beef is attributed to foot rot. Foot rot is an infectious condition that causes swelling, heat, and inflammation in cattle’s feet, resulting in severe lameness. Bacteria are responsible for causing foot rot. Fusobacterium necrphorum is the main foot rot causing bacterium. All the foot rot-causing microbes are mainly anaerobic, meaning they thrive in an environment without oxygen. Many of these bacteria are found in feces, so even healthy feet are present with bacteria.

Heat Stress | Bailey’s Bit About Nutrition

Heat Stress
Heat stress occurs when cows generate and absorb more heat than they can easily get rid of by respiration, sweating, and air blowing by them (wind or fan). Cows generate heat by digesting feed and producing milk. They absorb solar heat when out in the sun. If it is a hot day and the cow is out in the sun all day heat stress can occur.
Heat stress leads to increased respiration rates, body temperatures, sweating, and time standing.

Ask An Agronomist – Q&A with Jon Trappe, PhD, Technical Agronomist

Q: What is biological farming and how does it compare to organic farming?
A: Most organic farming practices implement biological farming principles, but not all biological farming practices are organic. Biological farming, much like organic farming, treats the soil as a living ecosystem that works best when care is taken to limit our negative effects on soil life.
Gary Zimmer, one of the co-founders of Midwestern BioAg, has refined the biological farming approach since the 1980s and has published two books on biological farming.

From the Desk of Gary Zimmer

Regenerative Agriculture: When do you start and how?
Dear farmers and agriculturalists,
It appears we live in a world with a lot of dissatisfied people. How do we determine what is right and what is wrong? The fun in farming, and in life, is to contribute. Contribute to the goal of healthy, mineralized soil by using the best knowledge, common sense, and observed practices to be stewards of the land and grow feed and food that is nutritional, clean and soil-building – that …

CUSTOMER SUCCESS STORY: Bio-Cal® on Galusha Farm

Steve Berning, owner of Galusha Farms in Warrenville, Illinois, has been a loyal customer to Midwestern BioAg for over 15 years. Berning cites flexibility, attention to detail, and timeliness as some of the reasons he chooses to work with MBA. “It is custom-tailored to what we need,” said Berning.
Berning has grown hay all his life. The oldest of seven children, he grew up on a dairy farm in the hills of Galena in northwest Illinois, milking cows, raising hogs, and growing hay.

Hay Cutting | Bailey’s Bit About Nutrition

When to cut hay is always tricky, as there are so many factors that go into it. First is the type of forage you have and its maturity. For example, bermudagrass is cut when it has greened up and reached 12-16 inches tall. Cutting the forage at optimal maturity will help maximize available nutrient content and minimize the fiber content that makes forage indigestible.
How low can you cut? When cutting alfalfa and clover, the lowest you could go would be 2 inches.

From the Ground Up | Summer 2021

From the Ground Up Newsletter | Summer 2021