BioAg Blog

From the Desk of Gary Zimmer

Dear farmers and agriculturalists,
 
It sure seems strange that the corn and bean price can remain so high. If you drive the country, it’s all you see. Does anyone believe the price will stay high forever? The livestock producers and energy makers sure don’t like it. The sad part is the cost of production has gone way up and doesn’t always drop back to where it was when grain prices are reduced.

Rumen Development in Calves | Bailey’s Bit About Nutrition

When calves are born, they start out as simple stomached animals. The change from one digestive method to another is a process that is called rumen development. The first two compartments make up one large fermentation vat, the third is an unusual-looking organ that absorbs water and minerals from digesta leaving the rumen, and the fourth is the true stomach that functions like the stomach of monogastric (people and pigs). All four of these stomachs are present at birth; however, only the abomasum is fully developed …

Why feed kelp to your herd?

Kelp is a natural feed supplement that is packed full of bioavailable minerals and vitamins. Kelp can be fed to cattle, sheep, goats, horses, pigs, and even chicken. Feeding kelp to livestock is an excellent source in filling in micronutrient deficiencies so the herd can improve digestion functions, reproductively, and their immune system. Healthier animals equal better productivity.
 
Here at Midwestern BioAg we provide Thorvin Kelp. Thorvin Kelp contains a broad array of bioavailable minerals, amino acids, and vitamins for superior …

From the Ground Up | Fall 2021

Fall 2021 Newsletter

Goat Nutrition | Bailey’s Bit About Nutrition

Goats are small ruminant animals that have no upper incisors or canine teeth but a dental pad instead. The rumen is the largest part of the four stomach compartments, with a capacity of roughly 2-6 pounds. Some bacteria and protozoa are normal habitants of the rumen which break down food into volatile fatty acids along with vitamins and amino acids. Daily feed take of goats ranges from 3-4% of body weight as expressed in pounds (dry matter/head/day).

Measuring your soil health like never before

Midwestern BioAg recently partnered with Trace Genomics in order to adopt the most advanced commercially available soil testing in the industry. Trace Genomics is a soil testing company that provides a full chemical as well as 21 biology and pathology analyses. Midwestern BioAg will be implementing these analyses to improve our scouting and recommendations to our customers.
Midwestern BioAg has been promoting biological farming for nearly 40 years. We’ve known from our extensive time as crop and soil consultants that biology is equally as important as …

Chris Kniffen begins as Director of Agronomy at Midwestern BioAg

Chris Kniffen of Yankton, S.D., begins as Director of Agronomy at Midwestern BioAg. Kniffen brings nearly 15 years of experience in agronomy and soil health. His priorities heading into the new role are to build new educational models and content funnels that can increase practice adoption and the advancement of biological agriculture.
“I am most excited for the opportunity to learn from the top minds and farmers in biological agriculture,” says Kniffen, “my goals are to identify and develop solutions as a team that overcome the …

Brian Anderson to Direct Sales at Midwestern BioAg

Brian Anderson of Ada, Mich., joins Midwestern BioAg as Director of Sales. With his 35 years of experience in agricultural sales, he will lead the sales and marketing teams, champion company philosophies and products and provide guidance on product positioning.
Most recently, Anderson has served as the Midwest Region Manager for NutriAg where he recruited national distribution, developed territory plans and facilitated new product training for sales consultants. Prior to that, he was the US Ag Business Manager for Precision Laboratories leading $50MM business in the …

Mold and Mycotoxin | Bailey’s Bit About Nutrition

Molds are fungi (fuzzy or dusty – appearing) that occur commonly in feedstuffs, including roughages and concentrates. Molds can infect dairy cattle causing a disease referred to as mycosis. Mycosis is most likely when cows may be immune-suppressed during stressful periods. A mycosis can occur in various locations such as lungs, mammary gland, uterus, or intestine. An intestinal infection may result in hemorrhagic bowel. Molds may also affect cattle by producing poisons called mycotoxins that affect animals when they consume contaminated feeds, resulting in a mycotoxicosis.

Equine Nutrition | Bailey’s Bit About Nutrition

Horses are not ruminants, but still can live off of plant material. Horses are grazing animals with digestive tracts best suited for eating forages for 15- 20 hours per day. Grass and hay are the natural feeds for horses due to the structure and shape of the equine digestive tract. Unlike the cow, their stomachs are relatively small and can only hold about eight quarts. Their stomachs can actually hold more, but the stomach begins to empty when it is only two-thirds full.